Dave Keech
Street Self Defense

Click here to edit subtitle

Legal Advisement


The information contained here is for reference only and is not intended to replace instruction from a professional teacher, and make sure you consult a medical professional before engaging in any physical exercise.


If you decide to act on any of the information given you assume all responsibility for the outcome, good or bad.


The moment you get physically involved with another person you open yourself up for possible criminal and civil action, and the chance of getting seriously hurt if things don't go in your favor. You have to weigh up the 'Pros & Cons' of your action or non-action.


Self Defense is all about using 'reasonable force', every location is different regarding who can defend who and what is considered reasonable, so some research is needed on your behalf. In some cases it allows you to protect an innocent third party, others allow you to defend against the realistic threat of an attack; others allow property, where to pets fit in here?


For Example:


If one strike from you stops the attacker, but you then deliver repeated elbows and knees until the attacker is unconscious, it’ll likely be considered excessive.


If the attacker turns and makes a run for it, only to be chased down by you and served up a barrage of kicks to the groin and head while pleading on the ground, you are now the attacker and Self Defense is probably not a viable claim in court. 


Remember you have to protect yourself, both from the attacker and the law.

As I live in Colorado, below are some of the laws concerning Self Defense;


Defense of a Person Laws


18-1-704 – Use of physical force in defense of a person.


(1) Except as provided in subsections (2) and (3) of this section, a person is justified in using physical force upon another person in order to defend himself or a third person from what he reasonably believes to be the use or imminent use of unlawful physical force by that other person, and he may use a degree of force which he reasonably believes to be necessary for that purpose.

(2) Deadly physical force may be used only if a person reasonably believes a lesser degree of force is inadequate and:
(a) The actor has reasonable ground to believe, and does believe, that he or another person is in imminent danger of being killed or of receiving great bodily injury; or
(b) The other person is using or reasonably appears about to use physical force against an occupant of a dwelling or business establishment while committing or attempting to commit burglary as defined in sections 18-4-202 to 18-4-204; or
(c) The other person is committing or reasonably appears about to commit kidnapping as defined in section 18-3-301 or 18-3-302, robbery as defined in section 18-4-301 or 18-4-302, sexual assault as set forth in section 18-3-402, or in section 18-3-403 as it existed prior to July 1, 2000, or assault as defined in sections 18-3-202 and 18-3-203.
(3) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (1) of this section, a person is not justified in using physical force if:
(a) With intent to cause bodily injury or death to another person, he provokes the use of unlawful physical force by that other person; or
(b) He is the initial aggressor; except that his use of physical force upon another person under the circumstances is justifiable if he withdraws from the encounter and effectively communicates to the other person his intent to do so, but the latter nevertheless continues or threatens the use of unlawful physical force; or
(c) The physical force involved is the product of a combat by agreement not specifically authorized by law.


Defense of Premises & Property Laws


18-1-704.5 – Use of deadly physical force against an intruder.


(1) The general assembly hereby recognizes that the citizens of Colorado have a right to expect absolute safety within their own homes.
(2) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 18-1-704, any occupant of a dwelling is justified in using any degree of physical force, including deadly physical force, against another person when that other person has made an unlawful entry into the dwelling, and when the occupant has a reasonable belief that such other person has committed a crime in the dwelling in addition to the uninvited entry, or is committing or intends to commit a crime against a person or property in addition to the uninvited entry, and when the occupant reasonably believes that such other person might use any physical force, no matter how slight, against any occupant.
(3) Any occupant of a dwelling using physical force, including deadly physical force, in accordance with the provisions of subsection (2) of this section shall be immune from criminal prosecution for the use of such force.
(4) Any occupant of a dwelling using physical force, including deadly physical force, in accordance with the provisions of subsection (2) of this section shall be immune from any civil liability for injuries or death resulting from the use of such force.


18-1-705 – Use of physical force in defense of premises.


A person in possession or control of any building, realty, or other premises, or a person who is licensed or privileged to be thereon, is justified in using reasonable and appropriate physical force upon another person when and to the extent that it is reasonably necessary to prevent or terminate what he reasonably believes to be the commission or attempted commission of an unlawful trespass by the other person in or upon the building, realty, or premises. However, he may use deadly force only in defense of himself or another as described in section 18-1-704, or when he reasonably believes it necessary to prevent what he reasonably believes to be an attempt by the trespasser to commit first degree arson.


18-1-706 – Use of physical force in defense of property.


A person is justified in using reasonable and appropriate physical force upon another person when and to the extent that he reasonably believes it necessary to prevent what he reasonably believes to be an attempt by the other person to commit theft, criminal mischief, or criminal tampering involving property, but he may use deadly physical force under these circumstances only in defense of himself or another as described in section 18-1-704.